Late center English (denoting the feeling of smell): native Old French sentir ‘perceive, smell,’ native Latin sentire . The enhancement of -c- (in the 17th century) is unexplained.

You are watching: Is the s or c silent in scent

So the c is silent and also shouldn't really be there.

The 'c' was probably added because that was the style at the time.

Originally a hunting term. The -c- showed up 17c., perhaps by affect of ascent, descent, etc., or by influence of science. This to be a tendency in early modern English, additionally in scythe and for a time threaten to do scite and also scituate.


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level 2
Op · 4y

Alright, the more you know, cheers mine man!


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· 4y

Thanks because that such a good contribution to the scub.


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level 2
· 4y

I to be going to indicate the c was silent due to the fact that in most situation (unless p adhered to by another constanent favor pneumonia or pterodactyl) the 2nd is generally silent. It would ha e simply been a guess: v though.


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level 1
· 4y
I to be going come guess neither! the is fascinating, though.


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level 2
· 4y

I agree. It's likely regional, but I express "scent" in different ways than "sent".

See more: Where'S This Quote From: "And Gosh Darn It People Like Me !"?


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